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In-Person Recruitment Most Effective to Reach Moms-to-Be
Hospital-based prenatal clinics also yield higher numbers of pregnant study participants

MONDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- In-person recruitment at hospital-based prenatal clinics produces the highest yield of early stage pregnant study participants, according to a study published online March 7 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

Kimberly Coleman-Phox, M.P.H., from the University of California San Francisco, and colleagues recruited 18- to 45-year-old, English-speaking, overweight and obese pregnant women. Participants were in the early stages of pregnancy and had an annual household income less than 500 percent of the federal poverty guidelines. Consenting participants enrolled in focus groups or an eight-week behavioral intervention.

The researchers found that, of 127 women screened for focus group participation, 69 were eligible and enrolled. There was a completion rate of 87 percent, with 57 women participating in nine focus groups and three women completing individual interviews. Contact was made with 204 women during recruitment for the intervention, with 135 women screened, 33 percent deemed eligible, and 69.1 percent of eligible women enrolling. An assessment was completed at one month postpartum by 82.6 percent of eligible women. Hospital-based prenatal clinics were the highest-yielding recruitment strategy.

"In-person recruitment was the most successful strategy; establishing close relationships with providers, clinic staff, social service providers, and study participants was essential to successful recruitment and retention," the authors write.

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